GABA 100g by SciFit

GABA, or gamma-aminobutyric acid, is the most abundant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. While GABA is an amino acid, it is classified as a neurotransmitter and helps induce relaxation and sleep. It balances the brain by inhibiting over-excitation. GABA contributes to motor control, vision, and many other cortical functions. Anxiety is also regulated by GABA. Some drugs that increase the level of GABA in the brain are used to treat epilepsy and to calm the trembling of people suffering from Huntington’s disease.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid also stimulates the anterior pituitary, leading to higher levels of Human Growth Hormone (HGH). Human Growth Hormone contributes significantly to muscle growth and also prevents the creation of fat cells.

WHEN IS GABA TAKEN?

GABA is taken before going to bed on an empty stomach. When we say "empty". we mean at least 45 minutes after your last meal. Taken GABA at this time works worth you body's natural tendency for increased growth hormone release approximately 90 minutes after you fall asleep. This evening dose correlates well with GABA's slight sedative effects for a restful nights sleep.

GABA'S ROLE IN THE BRAIN

GABA is made in brain cells from glutamate, and functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter – meaning that it blocks nerve impulses. Glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter and when bound to adjacent cells encourages them to “fire” and send a nerve impulse. GABA does the opposite and tells the adjoining cells not to “fire”, not to send an impulse.

  Without GABA, nerve cells fire too often and too easily. Anxiety disorders such as panic attacks, seizure disorders, and numerous other conditions including addiction, headaches, Parkinson's syndrome, and cognitive impairment are all related to low GABA activity. GABA hinders the transmission of nerve impulses from one neuron to another. It has a calming or quieting influence. A good example to help understand this effect is caffeine. Caffeine inhibits GABA release. The less GABA, the more nerve transmissions occur. Think what too much coffee feels like: that is the sensation of glutamate without enough GABA.

  The reason caffeine does this is that other molecules can bind to the neuron near the GABA binding site and influence GABA's effect. This is how tranquilizing drugs such as Benzodiazepines and barbiturates work. They increase or imitate GABA's effect, inhibiting nerve transmission

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